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Page 5

Newsletter 91, Winter 2010  © Hampshire Mills Group

 

CRUX EASTON

A FINE AND RARE EXAMPLE OF  VICTORIAN ENGINEERING 

HMG, HIAS and the Crux Easton Wind Engine Conservation Trust worked together in restoring this rare example of wind engine technology, erected in 1891 for the Earl of Carnarvon.  The painstaking restoration of this Grade II Listed engine earned a conservation award from Basingstoke and Dean District Council in 2003 for the high quality of craftsmanship carried out.

The impressive construction consists of a 20ft wind wheel on a 32ft hexagonal skeletal steel tower, which originally pumped water from a 350 ft deep well in addition to driving farm machinery to grind corn by harnessing wind via its 48 canvas sails, each of which is 5ft in length; (their angle is adjustable to allow for variations in the strength of the wind and a fan tail which enables the engine to turn into the wind).

There are actually two well known engineers connected to Crux Easton: the man who designed the Simplex Self-Regulating Geared Wind Engine, John Wallis Titt from Warminster in Wiltshire,  and Geoffrey de Havilland of aeronautical engineering fame.

On the last Open Day of 2010 there was an extremely rare event of commemoration for Geoffrey de Havilland

 

 

Ruth Andrews captures a Moth in Crux Easton field

Trustee Lyn Peet writes to tell us about it :

On Saturday, 11th September, Crux Easton  skies  were  a-buzz  with moths  – no, not  the  kind  that  eat clothes  – but members  of  the  de Havilland  Moth  Club  who  flew their planes  in  to  celebrate  the centenary (to  the  day) of  Sir Geoffrey de Havilland’s  first  successful  flight  in 1910, of an aeroplane  he  had designed  and  built  himself.

Some  25 – 30 planes  landed  on a field known as  de Havilland’s  and when  lined  up were an impressive sight.   Nearby, in the Wind Engine field,  marquees  and  a  hog roast  welcomed  the aviators  and  enthralled  visitors.

The  Crux  Easton  Wind  Engine  had  over  122  people  to view the well and  look  at  the  display  of  model  aeroplanes  together  with  press cuttings  about  Geoffrey de Havilland  and  his  family. 

The  church  had standing  room only for a talk about  him  and his father who was  Rector  here in the early 20th Century. 

A local band played  during the lunch break and there was a further talk on de Havilland’s various factories and the development of his aircraft.

It was a very special day.

sketch by Andrew Rutter

 

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