Hampshire Mills Group
HOME
Up
MILLS BOOK
MILLS OPEN
LIBRARY
LISTED MILLS
MILL HISTORY
HMG ACTIVITY
NEWSLETTERS
SNIPPETS
MILLS OVERSEAS
CONTACT
LINKS

 

 

Back Up Next

Page 7

Newsletter 87, Winter 2009 © Hampshire Mills Group

Broughton Manor Farm Staddle barn and attached Watermill

The watermill at Broughton Manor Farm was “discovered” in 1983-84. Dr. Robert Parr, the local historian, arranged for a photographic record to be made of it at the time, and the photos are catalogued and kept in his archive. The mill was drawn to the attention of HMG in late summer 2008, and was followed by a site visit and an amicable discussion with the owner. A detailed photographic record was made in autumn 2008, but no other work has been undertaken on site.

The owner is delighted for HMG to help him take positive action to ensure the conservation of the mill. HMG’s role will be to clean up the mill, undertake minor repairs to the fabic and machinery in consultation with him, and generally make it presentable to and safe for visitors.

Visitor access will be limited, and possibly restricted to pre-booked special interest groups.

HMG has undertaken to produce a guidebook/leaflet, which will be written in consultation with Dr. Parr.

The water supply to the mill was cut off many years ago, but the course of its headrace and tailrace is evident in the 1871 OS map.

The watermill is an integral part of a large timber frame and timber clad staddle barn that was built about the time of the parliamentary enclosure award for the parish, 1790. It has 2 threshing floors, and the watermill building is attached to the barn next to one of these. It is evident that a fixed threshing drum was installed on part of the latter’s floor. The drive to it was taken from he waterwheel’s great spurwheel and this remains, its shaft cut off at the point where it enters the barn. This arrangement is similar to that at Hockley Mill, built in 1804.

The watermill gearing is principally made of wood, and survives largely complete and in reasonably good condition. It is of the conventional 2-stage great spurwheel type. One set of underdriven millstones remains. The upper spurwheel carries drives for a sackhoist and ancillary machinery.

The internal waterwheel had a mid-breast feed. It is all-wood and of compass arm construction; the axle, arm and felloes remain complete and over half of its floats are still in situ.

Gavin Bowie, 10 March 2009

 Photos By Nigel Smith

A LOT OF CLEANING TO DO ON THE MILLSTONE FLOOR

THE COMPASS-ARM WATERWHEEL IN NEED OF A LITTLE TLC

DEEP CLEAN NEEDED

TOP OF SECONDARY UPRIGHT SHAFT SHOWING HORIZONTAL SHAFTS

STRIKE A LIGHT LOOK AT THE ROOF

 

YOU GO FIRST WITH THE COBWEBS ANGELA

 

Back Up Next


HOME ] Up ] MILLS BOOK ] MILLS OPEN ] LIBRARY ] LISTED MILLS ] MILL HISTORY ] HMG ACTIVITY ] NEWSLETTERS ] SNIPPETS ] MILLS OVERSEAS ] CONTACT ] LINKS ]

horizontal rule

Copyright © 2017 Hampshire Mills Group
Registered as a Charity - 1116607