Hampshire Mills Group
HOME
Up
MILLS BOOKS
MILLS OPEN
LIBRARY
LISTED MILLS
MILL HISTORY
HMG ACTIVITY
NEWSLETTERS
SNIPPETS
MILLS OVERSEAS
CONTACT
LINKS

 

 

Up Next

Page 2

Newsletter 125 Summer 2019   © Hampshire Mills Group

 

Meeting Report, 16 March 2019
Talk by Peter Hill : Windmills of the Channel Islands

 

 

Report by Alison Stott, Photos by Peter Hill

 

 

Some twenty years ago Peter had visited the Channel  Islands and discovered that there were very few records of the windmills which once existed.  He therefore set about doing a thorough survey, first of the windmills of Guernsey, Sark, and Herm, and a less detailed one of those on Jersey.

   

On Guernsey of the fifteen mills which once existed the remains of seven are still visible, either as derelict towers or converted into desirable residences.  One, Vale Mill (right) built in 1850, was heightened by 40ft. during the German Occupation to act as a lookout tower and still has the remains of graffiti visible inside.  Le Hechet (or Ozanneís) mill (below) built in 1825 was converted into living accommodation in about 1967.

There is no machinery in any of the mills but the towers are used as seamarks by the local fishermen.

Peter found just one record of a smock mill which was situated beside a local brickworks and used to pump water for the brick industry.

 

He then moved on to Sark where there were three windmills, two now being ruined but the third one the Seigneurial Mill (right) still has its machinery intact Ė although the Germans removed its sails and used the tower as an observation post.  

Peterís travels then took him to Herm, where he found just one mill (far right), a parallel-sided tower mill with a crenellated top and external stairway.  It was built by the Cordelier monks sometime between 1440 and 1485, but it was much restored in the mid 1880s, and is now used as a garden store.

 

 

 

Finally off to Jersey, the largest of the islands, which once had about 25 mills;  practically all have gone without trace apart from four. 

The first one, St. Martinís Mill, Rozel (far left), thought to have been built in 1799, is right by the coast, and was bought by the States of Jersey around 1900 to be used as a seamark.  Its height was increased by about a third during the German occupation, and it was used as a range-finding position.  It is still used as a seamark Ė hence the white paint.  The next one, New Mill at St. Peterís (centre), built in 1837, once had four patent sails which were replaced by a Petter oil engine which worked until the 1940s.  It is now surrounded by the buildings of a pub and has some dummy sails to attract tourists.

Another mill is just used as a seamark tower, and the last one is right at the southern end of the island and is in fact the most southerly surviving windmill in the British Isles.   It has been incorporated into a luxury private residence.

 

Up Next

 


HOME ] Up ] MILLS BOOKS ] MILLS OPEN ] LIBRARY ] LISTED MILLS ] MILL HISTORY ] HMG ACTIVITY ] NEWSLETTERS ] SNIPPETS ] MILLS OVERSEAS ] CONTACT ] LINKS ]

horizontal rule

Copyright © 2019 Hampshire Mills Group
Registered as a Charity - 1116607